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Calling all SUP paddlers in Wellington!
If you’re a paddleboarder in Wellington and you’d like to paddle with others (or indeed if you’re already part of a paddling group!) then please let us know – we have had a few individual paddlers contact us from the Wellington area looking for others to paddle with, and we’d be delighted to get you all in touch and a local group started. Either respond here or PM us if you’d prefer to keep it private.
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2 days ago

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OK this is great. So hopefully, if all of you, plus the couple who PM'd us, can now get in touch, one of you start a messenger and/or whatsapp group – and see what comes of it? And do keep us informed; we can add your group to our clubs website page, and – once lockdown levels allow – send one of our team down to come paddle with you, do some safety/technique workshops, whatever you need!

Keen although my work schedule is a pain👍

I'm keen. Based on the kapiti coast since moving here from Waiheke (where there are a load of paddling spots) in January. Would love to know some nearby spots for a paddle 😁

Keen

I'm keen. I don't know anyone else who does it. Not as fun on your own🤣

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EDUCATE YOURSELF!
Day seven of Safer Boating Week, and it’s time you to review your own sup safety knowledge. It is scarily clear from even a cursory examination of the severe accidents and fatalities that happen in paddleboarding, that education is a key factor. Knowing stuff makes all the difference. So ask yourself – how good is your safety knowledge? Could it do with a top-up?

Our online safety education courses cover how to choose and use your safety equipment, and understanding the conditions. They’re the perfect way to ensure you’re using the right gear, and to improve your general water knowledge.

Each course is split into numerous bite-sized lessons, offering a huge resource of information, videos, pix, analysis and commentary on all aspects of SUP Safety. You can work through each course lesson by lesson at your own pace and convenience, or just simply dip in to the bits that you specifically want to find out about. The online courses are COMPLETELY FREE, just follow the links to them from the NZSUP website.

Here’s a free sample of a typical lesson, this one covering really important aspects of inflatable PFDs for SUP. If you own, or are thinking of buying, a beltpack PFD you absolutely should watch this. Why do we recommend them? What are their pros and cons? Have you ever seen one inflated? Do you know what to do if yours doesn’t inflate? Check it all out here. And then sign up for the full course to get the same in-depth information on all the other aspects of SUP safety.

vimeo.com/517953706

Please share this post with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek
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4 days ago
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SUP SAFE!

Day six of Safer Boating week, and it’s time to recap. Things do go wrong. Every year the coastguard carries out many thousands of rescues around New Zealand, at a cost of literally hundreds of thousands of volunteer hours. Thousands of people are rescued – and sadly not everyone gets home safe.

Don’t be one of those people. Over the last 5 days we’ve worked through the five essential safety rules for sup – the SUP SAFE code.
* Always wear the correct type of leash for the conditions
* Wear a PFD
* Know the conditions, now and forecast
* Take 2 waterproof ways to call for help
* Tell someone onshore your plans

They’re really easy to do, they don’t ruin your freedom, or affect your paddling, but they will prevent you becoming a statistic.

We’re not suggesting you rigorously follow every one of these rules if you’re just going out on your local duckpond for a couple of minutes, or for messing around in the shallows at the beach. But if you’re going any distance, particularly if out of sight from where you started out, then why not follow the code. It’s super easy to do and it just makes so much sense.

Please share this post with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek
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5 days ago
SUP SAFE!
 
Day six of Safer Boating week, and it’s time to recap. Things do go wrong. Every year the coastguard carries out many thousands of rescues around New Zealand, at a cost of literally hundreds of thousands of volunteer hours. Thousands of people are rescued - and sadly not everyone gets home safe. 
 
Don’t be one of those people. Over the last 5 days we’ve worked through the five essential safety rules for sup - the SUP SAFE code.
* Always wear the correct type of leash for the conditions
* Wear a PFD
* Know the conditions, now and forecast
* Take 2 waterproof ways to call for help
* Tell someone onshore your plans

They’re really easy to do, they don’t ruin your freedom, or affect your paddling, but they will prevent you becoming a statistic. 

We’re not suggesting you rigorously follow every one of these rules if you’re just going out on your local duckpond for a couple of minutes, or for messing around in the shallows at the beach. But if you’re going any distance, particularly if out of sight from where you started out, then why not follow the code. It’s super easy to do and it just makes so much sense. 

Please share this post with all your paddling friends.  Don’t become a statistic - paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek

TELL SOMEONE YOU’RE GOING PADDLING!!
Day five of Safer Boating week, and point five of the SUP SAFE code. And this is such an easy thing to do – but it’s so often overlooked. If you’re going out for a paddle, just let someone onshore know – with a return time. If you do get in to trouble, no-one is going to be looking for you if they don’t even know you’ve gone out onto the water!
Iphone users are well served for this, with the excellent Paddle Logger app, which allows you to log a trip, and a message will be sent to your designated contact if you don’t close the trip by the required time. An android version is apparently on the way.
The NZ Coastguard app works on all platforms and has an excellent log-a-trip function which does the same job (good NZ forecast and nowcast info on their app too!).
Even if you’re going out paddling with mates – which is alway safer than paddling alone – it’s important that someone onshore knows the general plan.
It’s so easy to do, yet could make all the difference if something goes wrong.
Please share this post with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek
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6 days ago
TELL SOMEONE YOU’RE GOING PADDLING!!
Day five of Safer Boating week, and point five of the SUP SAFE code.  And this is such an easy thing to do - but it’s so often overlooked.  If you’re going out for a paddle, just let someone onshore know - with a return time. If you do get in to trouble, no-one is going to be looking for you if they don’t even know you’ve gone out onto the water!
Iphone users are well served for this, with the excellent Paddle Logger app, which allows you to log a trip, and a message will be sent to your designated contact if you don’t close the trip by the required time.   An android version is apparently on the way. 
The NZ Coastguard app works on all platforms and has an excellent log-a-trip function which does the same job (good NZ forecast and nowcast info on their app too!).
Even if you’re going out paddling with mates - which is alway safer than paddling alone -  it’s important that someone onshore knows the general plan.
It’s so easy to do, yet could make all the difference if something goes wrong.
Please share this post with all your paddling friends.  Don’t become a statistic - paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek

CARRY COMMUNICATIONS!
Day four of NZ Safer Boating Week, and today’s message is simple, but super important. If you’re going out paddling for anything more than a quick jolly at the local beach, carry some comms! What will you do if you are out on your paddleboard and you get into difficulties – or you find someone else in difficulties? Can you communicate? It’s an essential part of SUP safety.
There have been numerous rescues of paddlecraft (including paddleboards) where the paddlers had been caught out by a strong offshore wind – but were able to call for help using their cellphones. They were still a long way offshore by the time the rescue services reached them. Without their phones they would almost certainly have not been found in time. And this is one scenario where it doesn’t matter how good your leash or PFD are! It’s the comms that will save your life.

The Maritime NZ Safer Boating code recommends that all recreational boaties (which includes us) carry two forms of communication. Which is perfectly realistic for us paddleboarders; carry your cellphone (in a waterproof bag if necessary) if there is a good signal in your paddling area, or a handheld marine VHF (with channel 16), and the whistle that your PFD came with. (If you haven’t got a whistle, get a Fox40 from your nearest Rebel Sport – super loud and waterproof.) . Remember, waving your paddle is another great way of attracting attention.

Having your phone makes sense for so many reasons anyway – all the cool GPS tracking apps giving you info on how far and fast you’ve gone etc, your camera to take pix and vid when that dolphin cruises by, your music collection, knowledge apps for first aid, wildlife spotting etc etc. And it might save your life too.

For much more information on comms for SUP why not take our free SUP SAFE course on all aspects of your safety equipment. Check it out at www.sup.org.nz/education/sup-safe-course/
Please share this post with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek
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1 week ago
CARRY COMMUNICATIONS!
Day four of NZ Safer Boating Week, and today’s message is simple, but super important. If you’re going out paddling for anything more than a quick jolly at the local beach,  carry some comms!   What will you do if you are out on your paddleboard and you get into difficulties - or you find someone else in difficulties? Can you communicate? It’s an essential part of SUP safety.
There have been numerous rescues of paddlecraft (including paddleboards) where the paddlers had been caught out by a strong offshore wind - but were able to call for help using their cellphones. They were still a long way offshore by the time the rescue services reached them. Without their phones they would almost certainly have not been found in time. And this is one scenario where it doesn’t matter how good your leash or PFD are!  It’s the comms that will save your life.

The Maritime NZ Safer Boating code recommends that all recreational boaties (which includes us) carry two forms of communication. Which is perfectly realistic for us paddleboarders; carry your cellphone (in a waterproof bag if necessary) if there is a good signal in your paddling area, or a handheld marine VHF (with channel 16),  and the whistle that your PFD came with. (If you haven’t got a whistle, get a Fox40 from your nearest Rebel Sport - super loud and waterproof.) . Remember, waving your paddle is another great way of attracting attention.

Having your phone makes sense for so many reasons anyway - all the cool GPS tracking apps giving you info on how far and fast you’ve gone etc, your camera to take pix and vid when that dolphin cruises by, your music collection, knowledge apps for first aid, wildlife spotting etc etc. And it might save your life too.

For much more information on comms for SUP why not take our free SUP SAFE course on all aspects of your safety equipment. Check it out at https://www.sup.org.nz/education/sup-safe-course/
Please share this post with all your paddling friends.  Don’t become a statistic - paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek

Day three of Safer Boating Week, and today we’re talking about the part of SUP safety that happens before you get anywhere near the water. KNOWING THE CONDITIONS!

There’s absolutely no excuse for not knowing the weather/water conditions before you go paddleboarding – everything you need is right there on your phone.
Don’t just look at the numbers. Take that extra minute to think about them, absorb them, consider them, what do they really mean. Visualise what it’s going to be like.
Now that you KNOW the conditions, think again about the paddle session you’re planning. Is your equipment right for it – which includes the clothing you intend to wear. Is your ability up to the challenge, is your fitness up to it? This is a really important consideration, particularly if you haven’t been on the water for a while, because of lockdowns! Don’t bite off more than you can chew.
It only takes a few seconds to get all the information you need from the excellent forecast and nowcast apps available on your phone, and a few more seconds to give those conditions some consideration and make your judgement calls. And those few seconds could save you a whole lot of problems, stress, it may even save your life. Always err on the side of caution; if you’re not sure, head for a spot or route that’s more sheltered.
If you’re unsure about any of this, or would just like to top up your knowledge of understanding the conditions, interpreting weather forecasts, that sort of thing, check out our FREE safety course that will take you through every aspect of it.
www.supinstructors.nz/safety-and-rescue-courses/
Please share this post with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – Follow the SUP SAFE code, and paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek #nzsup
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1 week ago
Day three of Safer Boating Week, and today we’re talking about the part of SUP safety that happens before you get anywhere near the water.  KNOWING THE CONDITIONS!
 
There’s absolutely no excuse for not knowing the weather/water conditions before you go paddleboarding - everything you need is right there on your phone. 
Don’t just look at the numbers. Take that extra minute to think about them, absorb them, consider them, what do they really mean. Visualise what it’s going to be like. 
Now that you KNOW the conditions, think again about the paddle session you’re planning. Is your equipment right for it - which includes the clothing you intend to wear. Is your ability up to the challenge, is your fitness up to it? This is a really important consideration, particularly if you haven’t been on the water for a while, because of lockdowns! Don’t bite off more than you can chew. 
It only takes a few seconds to get all the information you need from the excellent forecast and nowcast apps available on your phone, and a few more seconds to give those conditions some consideration and make your judgement calls. And those few seconds could save you a whole lot of problems, stress, it may even save your life. Always err on the side of caution; if you’re not sure, head for a spot or route that’s more sheltered. 
If you’re unsure about any of this, or would just like to top up your knowledge of understanding the conditions, interpreting weather forecasts, that sort of thing, check out our FREE safety course that will take you through every aspect of it. 
https://www.supinstructors.nz/safety-and-rescue-courses/
Please share this post with all your paddling friends.  Don’t become a statistic - Follow the SUP SAFE code, and paddle safe! 
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek #nzsup

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We've been asked what sort of things should we know? So here's a few of the main things to consider. What strength and direction is the wind is going to be at the venue you are planning to paddle? If it’s blowing offshore and strengthening, maybe consider paddling somewhere else (or not at all!). Is there any significant change in the weather coming, ie rain, temperature changes etc, that may determine what you should be wearing. Particularly at this time of year – showery rain may mean wind squalls, thundercloud, possibly even tornados. If you’re going out on the coast, what is the tide doing? Is it coming in or out, how long till high tide/low tide. Understanding tides is vital, it tells you how strong the currents will be, and the state of the coastline, in terms of exposed rocks, beaches etc. If it’s low tide then you may have a few hundred metres of mud to cross in order to get to the water, while at high tide there may not even be a beach at all. Is there going to be a swell, shorebreak or surf at your chosen venue? Remember too, what you’re wearing also needs to take into account the WATER temperature. At this time of year, the sun can be hot but the water could still be in single figures. If you got separated from your board and you’re just in teeshirt and shorts, you could be in big trouble… All this information can be found quickly and easily from any good surf/wind/weather app. If you're inland paddling on a river, you might want also to check the flow rate. Again, this info is not hard to find. And knowing it makes all the difference in terms of safety and preparation.

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