The association for all things SUP in NZ

NZSUP inc campaigns on behalf of all paddleboarders in New Zealand on matters of safety, legislation and all other aspects of negotiation and liaison with other governing bodies.  NZSUP organises the national race championships and teams for international events, and oversees SUP schools and instruction in New Zealand.

News & Updates

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Faces of SUP #1
Over winter we will be sharing a few Q & A interviews with some of our faces of SUP in New Zealand. This week we have started with one of the best race smiles in SUP Jan Dunlop. No matter what the race Jan is always on the start line and most often the Podium. Jan Dunlop SUP tip’s here are a must read.

Q.Where do you live?
A.Torbay, Auckland

Q.How long have you been paddling?
A.I started paddle boarding around 2017 as a way to get some exercise. I was unfit, overweight and had high blood pressure, so something needed to change.
Q.How often do you paddle?
A.3-5 times a week, mostly I go early in the morning, it’s a great way to start the day.

Q. Tells us about your favourite Paddle Events or Favourite place to paddle?
A.I enjoy long-distance events, especially in interesting locations. The Cambridge to Hamilton and Waikato 100 races are both near the top of the list for the extra adventure aspect. I was planning on doing the Yukon River Quest (a multi-day adventure race) back in 2020 but Covid put an end to that.

Q.What are you training for next? any other SUP goals?
A.Nothing specific at the moment, just working on overall fitness and learning more about how to train smarter, not harder to avoid overuse injuries.

Q.What Sports did you did as a kid?
A.I grew up in Fiji so surfing, windsurfing, sailing and scuba diving were all a big part of my life there.

Q.As a multiple NZ masters champ, do you have any tips?
A.Here are a few training tips I have picked up over the years.

Tip #1 – Figure out your training zones
If you can, get a sports watch and a heart rate strap (wrist-based hr is not that accurate). Otherwise, get familiar with the Rate of Perceived exertion scale RPE and use that.

Work out your training zones. You can use the default method of calculation (220 – your age) but this can be off by quite a bit so do some testing and figure out what your max heart rate and your lactate threshold are. You can then tweak your zones to suit as you learn more about this and figure out what works for you.

Tip #2 – Go slower to go faster
Zone 2 training is great for focusing on paddle technique, nasal breathing and developing your aerobic base which helps sustain faster paces over longer distances. At the cellular level, this builds the number and size of the mitochondria in your muscle cells and improves their ability to burn fat as an energy source rather than glucose (which produces lactate).

I aim to spend approx. 80% of my time going at a zone 2 pace (easy conversational pace).

Tip #3 – Learn to love intervals
Doing speed work is also a critical part of going faster. Two types of interval sessions I do fairly often are:
Lactate threshold intervals (zone 4 focus)- So this involves paddling at or just below your lactate threshold heart rate for short blocks of time (4-8’) with short rests in between. This is about building your ability to tolerate high lactate levels. The ratio of work to rest is usually 2 to 1. So a typical workout might be 4’ at zone 4 with 2’ zone 2 recovery and repeat 8 times.
V02 max intervals (zone 5 focus) – So this involves going all out for shorter periods, followed by a slightly longer recovery period to fully clear lactate so you can go 100% again. So a typical workout here might be 1’ at zone 5 with 2’ rest and repeat that 8 times.

I generally aim to do around 20% of my training as speed work. So I might do 3-4 zone 2 sessions and one speed session per week OR I might tack on some speed work to a few of my zone 2 sessions. It’s OK to tack speed work on the end, but not at the beginning of a workout as speed work bumps you out of your fat-burning mode.

Tip #4 – Avoiding injuries
Injuries suck and we all get them especially as we get older. Here’s what’s been working well for me recently:
I find a good 15-20 minute warm-up helps loosen things up before attempting any high-intensity work.
Cross-training (running) has helped me with balance and endurance, especially in those rougher race conditions.
Yoga and foam rolling help loosen up tight muscles and knots.
I try to do a few strength sessions every week, I need to work on this.
Every third week I take things a bit easier to allow for extra recovery, so two weeks on and one week easy.
If you develop shoulder issues, look at your paddle length, I have shortened mine a few times and this has helped me with shoulder issues.

Q. What gear do you like to use?
My Essential SUP Equipment
Starboard Sprint for flat water training and races
Starboard Ace for downwinding and rough conditions
Quickblade Trifecta paddle
Garmin watch & HR strap
Sträva & Garmin Connect apps for monitoring training progress
Freeletics app for at home for strength training

Useful Training Resources I have found
Training zones playlist:
youtube.com/playlist
Also, if you have the time, this is an amazing podcast about zone 2 training:
Deep dive back into Zone 2 Training | Iñigo San-Millán, Ph.D. & Peter Attia, M.D.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6PDBVRkCKc
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2 days ago
Faces of SUP #1
Over winter we will be sharing a few Q & A interviews with some  of our faces of SUP in New Zealand.  This week we have started with one of the best race smiles in SUP Jan Dunlop.  No matter what the race Jan is always on the start line and most often  the Podium.  Jan Dunlop SUP tips here are a  must read.

Q.Where do you live?
A.Torbay, Auckland

Q.How long have you been paddling? 
A.I started paddle boarding around 2017 as a way to get some exercise. I was unfit, overweight and had high blood pressure, so something needed to change. 
Q.How often do you paddle? 
A.3-5 times a week, mostly I go early in the morning, it’s a great way to start the day. 

Q. Tells us about your favourite Paddle Events or Favourite place to paddle?
A.I enjoy long-distance events, especially in interesting locations. The Cambridge to Hamilton and Waikato 100 races are both near the top of the list for the extra adventure aspect. I was planning on doing the Yukon River Quest (a multi-day adventure race) back in 2020 but Covid put an end to that. 

Q.What are you training for next?  any other SUP goals?
A.Nothing specific at the moment, just working on overall fitness and learning more about how to train smarter, not harder to avoid overuse injuries. 

Q.What Sports did you did as a kid? 
A.I grew up in Fiji so surfing, windsurfing, sailing and scuba diving were all a big part of my life there. 

Q.As a multiple NZ masters champ, do you have any tips?
A.Here are a few training tips I have picked up over the years. 

Tip #1 - Figure out your training zones
If you can, get a sports watch and a heart rate strap (wrist-based hr is not that accurate). Otherwise, get familiar with the Rate of Perceived exertion scale RPE and use that. 

Work out your training zones. You can use the default method of calculation (220 - your age) but this can be off by quite a bit so do some testing and figure out what your max heart rate and your lactate threshold are. You can then tweak your zones to suit as you learn more about this and figure out what works for you. 

Tip #2 - Go slower to go faster 
Zone 2 training is great for focusing on paddle technique, nasal breathing and developing your aerobic base which helps sustain faster paces over longer distances. At the cellular level, this builds the number and size of the mitochondria in your muscle cells and improves their ability to burn fat as an energy source rather than glucose (which produces lactate). 

I aim to spend approx. 80% of my time going at a zone 2 pace (easy conversational pace).

Tip #3 - Learn to love intervals 
Doing speed work is also a critical part of going faster. Two types of interval sessions I do fairly often are:
Lactate threshold intervals (zone 4 focus)- So this involves paddling at or just below your lactate threshold heart rate for short blocks of time (4-8’) with short rests in between. This is about building your ability to tolerate high lactate levels. The ratio of work to rest is usually 2 to 1. So a typical workout might be 4’ at zone 4 with 2’ zone 2 recovery and repeat 8 times. 
V02 max intervals (zone 5 focus) - So this involves going all out for shorter periods, followed by a slightly longer recovery period to fully clear lactate so you can go 100% again. So a typical workout here might be 1’ at zone 5 with 2’ rest and repeat that 8 times. 

I generally aim to do around 20% of my training as speed work. So I might do 3-4 zone 2 sessions and one speed session per week OR I might tack on some speed work to a few of my zone 2 sessions. It’s OK to tack speed work on the end, but not at the beginning of a workout as speed work bumps you out of your fat-burning mode. 

Tip #4 - Avoiding injuries
Injuries suck and we all get them especially as we get older. Here’s what’s been working well for me recently:
    I find a good 15-20 minute warm-up helps loosen things up before attempting any high-intensity work.
    Cross-training (running) has helped me with balance and endurance, especially in those rougher race conditions.
    Yoga and foam rolling help loosen up tight muscles and knots.
    I try to do a few strength sessions every week, I need to work on this.
    Every third week I take things a bit easier to allow for extra recovery, so two weeks on and one week easy.
    If you develop shoulder issues, look at your paddle length, I have shortened mine a few times and this has helped me with shoulder issues.

Q. What  gear do you like to use?
My Essential SUP Equipment
    Starboard Sprint for flat water training and races
    Starboard Ace for downwinding and rough conditions
    Quickblade Trifecta paddle 
    Garmin watch & HR strap
    Sträva & Garmin Connect apps for monitoring training progress
    Freeletics app for at home for strength training 

Useful Training Resources I have found
Training zones playlist:
https://youtube.com/playlist...
Also, if you have the time, this is an amazing podcast about zone 2 training:
Deep dive back into Zone 2 Training | Iñigo San-Millán, Ph.D. & Peter Attia, M.D.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6PDBVRkCKc

Entries are now live! Get in quick to get the early bird special.
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1 week ago

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Upcoming Events

Recurring

Riverside SUP Paddle

Whangarei Town Basin Quayside, Whangarei, Northland

Every Tuesday evening, right throughout the year,  the Riverside Paddlers launch into the Whangarei basin and have a social paddle and fun race - usually from the main town basin

Recurring

Stone Store Stand-Up

Kerikeri Basin 215 Kerikeri Road, Kerikeri, Northland

Every Thursday evening right throughout the year, from 5pm - 6.30pm, stand up paddleboarding enthusiasts from all over the Far North get together at the Kerikeri Basin (by the Stone

Recurring

Riverside SUP Paddle

Whangarei Town Basin Quayside, Whangarei, Northland

Every Tuesday evening, right throughout the year,  the Riverside Paddlers launch into the Whangarei basin and have a social paddle and fun race - usually from the main town basin

Recurring

Stone Store Stand-Up

Kerikeri Basin 215 Kerikeri Road, Kerikeri, Northland

Every Thursday evening right throughout the year, from 5pm - 6.30pm, stand up paddleboarding enthusiasts from all over the Far North get together at the Kerikeri Basin (by the Stone

2022 Triple Crown

Kerikeri Basin 215 Kerikeri Road, Kerikeri, Northland

Back by popular demand, the 3 day SUP event in the Bay of Islands over the Queen's Birthday Long Weekend. 3 days, 3 races, 3 venues - the aim as always being to try and achieve as much variation as possible. Flat water, downwind, technical, whatever the conditions allow. But you've got to do it all on the same board. Shorter/easier races for less experienced paddlers. Check it out and get your registration in at http://supnorth.nz/

$70
Recurring

Riverside SUP Paddle

Whangarei Town Basin Quayside, Whangarei, Northland

Every Tuesday evening, right throughout the year,  the Riverside Paddlers launch into the Whangarei basin and have a social paddle and fun race - usually from the main town basin

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