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CARRY COMMUNICATIONS!
Day four of NZ Safer Boating Week, and today’s message is simple, but super important. If you’re going out paddling for anything more than a quick jolly at the local beach, carry some comms! What will you do if you are out on your paddleboard and you get into difficulties – or you find someone else in difficulties? Can you communicate? It’s an essential part of SUP safety.
There have been numerous rescues of paddlecraft (including paddleboards) where the paddlers had been caught out by a strong offshore wind – but were able to call for help using their cellphones. They were still a long way offshore by the time the rescue services reached them. Without their phones they would almost certainly have not been found in time. And this is one scenario where it doesn’t matter how good your leash or PFD are! It’s the comms that will save your life.

The Maritime NZ Safer Boating code recommends that all recreational boaties (which includes us) carry two forms of communication. Which is perfectly realistic for us paddleboarders; carry your cellphone (in a waterproof bag if necessary) if there is a good signal in your paddling area, or a handheld marine VHF (with channel 16), and the whistle that your PFD came with. (If you haven’t got a whistle, get a Fox40 from your nearest Rebel Sport – super loud and waterproof.) . Remember, waving your paddle is another great way of attracting attention.

Having your phone makes sense for so many reasons anyway – all the cool GPS tracking apps giving you info on how far and fast you’ve gone etc, your camera to take pix and vid when that dolphin cruises by, your music collection, knowledge apps for first aid, wildlife spotting etc etc. And it might save your life too.

For much more information on comms for SUP why not take our free SUP SAFE course on all aspects of your safety equipment. Check it out at www.sup.org.nz/education/sup-safe-course/
Please share this post with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek
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20 hours ago
CARRY COMMUNICATIONS!
Day four of NZ Safer Boating Week, and today’s message is simple, but super important. If you’re going out paddling for anything more than a quick jolly at the local beach,  carry some comms!   What will you do if you are out on your paddleboard and you get into difficulties - or you find someone else in difficulties? Can you communicate? It’s an essential part of SUP safety.
There have been numerous rescues of paddlecraft (including paddleboards) where the paddlers had been caught out by a strong offshore wind - but were able to call for help using their cellphones. They were still a long way offshore by the time the rescue services reached them. Without their phones they would almost certainly have not been found in time. And this is one scenario where it doesn’t matter how good your leash or PFD are!  It’s the comms that will save your life.

The Maritime NZ Safer Boating code recommends that all recreational boaties (which includes us) carry two forms of communication. Which is perfectly realistic for us paddleboarders; carry your cellphone (in a waterproof bag if necessary) if there is a good signal in your paddling area, or a handheld marine VHF (with channel 16),  and the whistle that your PFD came with. (If you haven’t got a whistle, get a Fox40 from your nearest Rebel Sport - super loud and waterproof.) . Remember, waving your paddle is another great way of attracting attention.

Having your phone makes sense for so many reasons anyway - all the cool GPS tracking apps giving you info on how far and fast you’ve gone etc, your camera to take pix and vid when that dolphin cruises by, your music collection, knowledge apps for first aid, wildlife spotting etc etc. And it might save your life too.

For much more information on comms for SUP why not take our free SUP SAFE course on all aspects of your safety equipment. Check it out at https://www.sup.org.nz/education/sup-safe-course/
Please share this post with all your paddling friends.  Don’t become a statistic - paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek

Day three of Safer Boating Week, and today we’re talking about the part of SUP safety that happens before you get anywhere near the water. KNOWING THE CONDITIONS!

There’s absolutely no excuse for not knowing the weather/water conditions before you go paddleboarding – everything you need is right there on your phone.
Don’t just look at the numbers. Take that extra minute to think about them, absorb them, consider them, what do they really mean. Visualise what it’s going to be like.
Now that you KNOW the conditions, think again about the paddle session you’re planning. Is your equipment right for it – which includes the clothing you intend to wear. Is your ability up to the challenge, is your fitness up to it? This is a really important consideration, particularly if you haven’t been on the water for a while, because of lockdowns! Don’t bite off more than you can chew.
It only takes a few seconds to get all the information you need from the excellent forecast and nowcast apps available on your phone, and a few more seconds to give those conditions some consideration and make your judgement calls. And those few seconds could save you a whole lot of problems, stress, it may even save your life. Always err on the side of caution; if you’re not sure, head for a spot or route that’s more sheltered.
If you’re unsure about any of this, or would just like to top up your knowledge of understanding the conditions, interpreting weather forecasts, that sort of thing, check out our FREE safety course that will take you through every aspect of it.
www.supinstructors.nz/safety-and-rescue-courses/
Please share this post with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – Follow the SUP SAFE code, and paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek #nzsup
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2 days ago
Day three of Safer Boating Week, and today we’re talking about the part of SUP safety that happens before you get anywhere near the water.  KNOWING THE CONDITIONS!
 
There’s absolutely no excuse for not knowing the weather/water conditions before you go paddleboarding - everything you need is right there on your phone. 
Don’t just look at the numbers. Take that extra minute to think about them, absorb them, consider them, what do they really mean. Visualise what it’s going to be like. 
Now that you KNOW the conditions, think again about the paddle session you’re planning. Is your equipment right for it - which includes the clothing you intend to wear. Is your ability up to the challenge, is your fitness up to it? This is a really important consideration, particularly if you haven’t been on the water for a while, because of lockdowns! Don’t bite off more than you can chew. 
It only takes a few seconds to get all the information you need from the excellent forecast and nowcast apps available on your phone, and a few more seconds to give those conditions some consideration and make your judgement calls. And those few seconds could save you a whole lot of problems, stress, it may even save your life. Always err on the side of caution; if you’re not sure, head for a spot or route that’s more sheltered. 
If you’re unsure about any of this, or would just like to top up your knowledge of understanding the conditions, interpreting weather forecasts, that sort of thing, check out our FREE safety course that will take you through every aspect of it. 
https://www.supinstructors.nz/safety-and-rescue-courses/
Please share this post with all your paddling friends.  Don’t become a statistic - Follow the SUP SAFE code, and paddle safe! 
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek #nzsup

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We've been asked what sort of things should we know? So here's a few of the main things to consider. What strength and direction is the wind is going to be at the venue you are planning to paddle? If it’s blowing offshore and strengthening, maybe consider paddling somewhere else (or not at all!). Is there any significant change in the weather coming, ie rain, temperature changes etc, that may determine what you should be wearing. Particularly at this time of year – showery rain may mean wind squalls, thundercloud, possibly even tornados. If you’re going out on the coast, what is the tide doing? Is it coming in or out, how long till high tide/low tide. Understanding tides is vital, it tells you how strong the currents will be, and the state of the coastline, in terms of exposed rocks, beaches etc. If it’s low tide then you may have a few hundred metres of mud to cross in order to get to the water, while at high tide there may not even be a beach at all. Is there going to be a swell, shorebreak or surf at your chosen venue? Remember too, what you’re wearing also needs to take into account the WATER temperature. At this time of year, the sun can be hot but the water could still be in single figures. If you got separated from your board and you’re just in teeshirt and shorts, you could be in big trouble… All this information can be found quickly and easily from any good surf/wind/weather app. If you're inland paddling on a river, you might want also to check the flow rate. Again, this info is not hard to find. And knowing it makes all the difference in terms of safety and preparation.

Day two of Safer Boating Week, and today it’s time to turn our SUP Safety focus to the PFD. New Zealand law says you have to have one when you are stand up paddleboarding, unless you are sup surfing. Yes folks, it’s the law. And in many regions of New Zealand, the harbourmaster will fine you for not wearing one.
So what sort should you choose? There are lots of different types of PFD, including some excellent beltpack PFDs which are effortless to wear and don’t restrict movement in any way. So there really isn’t any excuse for you not to follow the law.
And it’s not just about the law. The simple truth is that, if you did get separated from your board, your PFD will greatly increase your chances of survival. It’s just a really smart plan to wear one.
Follow the link from this post to the article all about PFDs on our website, or take our FREE online safety course which will teach you everything you need to know about the different types of PFDs, which one you should be using, and what you need to know about using it and looking after it. Particularly important if you get a beltpack, because there is definitely stuff you need to know about these.
Please share this message with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – Follow the SUP SAFE code, and paddle safe!

@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek #nzsup
www.nzsup.org/…/sup-safety/understanding-pfds/
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3 days ago
Day two of Safer Boating Week, and today it’s time to turn our SUP Safety focus to the PFD.  New Zealand law says you have to have one when you are stand up paddleboarding, unless you are sup surfing.  Yes folks, it’s the law. And in many regions of New Zealand, the harbourmaster will fine you for not wearing one. 
So what sort should you choose? There are lots of different types of PFD, including some excellent beltpack PFDs which are effortless to wear and don’t restrict movement in any way. So there really isn’t any excuse for you not to follow the law.
And it’s not just about the law. The simple truth is that, if you did get separated from your board, your PFD will greatly increase your chances of survival. It’s just a really smart plan to wear one. 
Follow the link from this post to the article all about PFDs on our website, or take our FREE  online safety course which will teach you everything you need to know about the different types of PFDs, which one you should be using, and what you need to know about using it and looking after it.  Particularly important if you get a beltpack, because there is definitely stuff you need to know about these. 
Please share this message with all your paddling friends.   Don’t become a statistic - Follow the SUP SAFE code, and paddle safe! 
 
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek #nzsup
http://www.nzsup.org/.../sup-safety/understanding-pfds/

This week is New Zealand Safer Boating Week, so each day we’re going to be looking at an aspect of SUP safety. First up- the most important safety item of all for us paddlers: leashes.

#1 on the SUP SAFE code: Wear a leash, that is appropriate for the conditions
The leash is #1 because without one you can all too easily lose your board.
But when did you last check your leash? Leashes break! If there are any tears or dents in the cord, throw it away. It’s a bit harder to check a coiled leash, but do your best. Give the swivels a good hard tug. Is it going to come apart soon? If so, get a new one.
Next up, is it the appropriate leash for the conditions you paddle in? The problem with leashes is that there is no one type which is right for every environment. This matters! Every year there are fatalities caused by wearing the wrong type of leash for the conditions. (Although there are far more emergency incidents caused by people not wearing a leash at all, so don’t ever be tempted not to wear one).
Ask yourself, how much do you really know about leashes? Do you understand the different types, and know which you should be using when? Follow the link from this post to the article explaining leashes on our website, or take our FREE online safety course which will teach you everything you need to know about SUP safety equipment.
Please share this message with all your paddling friends. Don’t become a statistic – Follow the SUP SAFE code, and paddle safe!
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek #nzsup #supsafe
www.nzsup.org/…/all-about-sup/sup-safety/the-leash/
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4 days ago
This week is New Zealand Safer Boating Week, so each day we’re going to be looking at an aspect of SUP safety.  First up- the most important safety item of all for us paddlers: leashes. 
 
#1 on the SUP SAFE code:  Wear a leash, that is appropriate for the conditions 
The leash is #1 because without one you can all too easily lose your board. 
But when did you last check your leash?  Leashes break! If there are any tears or dents in the cord, throw it away. It’s a bit harder to check a coiled leash, but do your best. Give the swivels a good hard tug.  Is it going to come apart soon? If so, get a new one.
Next up, is it the appropriate leash for the conditions you paddle in? The problem with leashes is that there is no one type which is right for every environment. This matters! Every year there are fatalities caused by wearing the wrong type of leash for the conditions. (Although there are far more emergency incidents caused by people not wearing a leash at all, so don’t ever be tempted not to wear one).
Ask yourself, how much do you really know about leashes? Do you understand the different types, and know which you should be using when? Follow the link from this post to the article explaining leashes on our website, or take our FREE  online safety course which will teach you everything you need to know about SUP safety equipment. 
Please share this message with all your paddling friends.   Don’t become a statistic - Follow the SUP SAFE code, and paddle safe! 
@saferboating #SaferBoatingWeek #nzsup  #supsafe
http://www.nzsup.org/.../all-about-sup/sup-safety/the-leash/

Check this out essential workers – thx Moana Sup 🙏This one’s for our essential workers!

We’re gifting a Moana Kehu Inflatable Stand Up Paddleboard to one of the many deserving essential workers.

Kehu ISUP is a great board for coastal, lake, river and canal adventures. Sleek and long means a smooth and effortless comfortable paddle. Great for cruising and heaps of fun for families.
Head to our website to check out all the details moananzsup.co.nz/product/kehu

Nominate an essential worker with a quick reason why they should win a Kehu ISUP.

*Tag an essential worker with a quick sentence in the comments below.
*Share this post.
*Make sure you and your nominated essential worker like our page Moana SUP & Surf Shop
*Entries open untill untill the 31st October 2021.
*Nominate as many people as you like.
*NZ comp only.
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1 week ago
Check this out essential workers - thx Moana Sup 🙏

Comment on Facebook

Do Early Childhood Teachers count 🙂

Hey northlanders, go and join the fun at the Whangarei town basin every Tuesday 5.30pm. Highly recommended 😎🤙🏽Tuesday Night Paddleboarding now 5-30pm Start time under the canopy bridge. Anyone with a board, paddle and leggy welcome 🤙🏻 See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago
Hey northlanders, go and join the fun at the Whangarei town basin every Tuesday 5.30pm. Highly recommended 😎🤙🏽
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